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Issue 12 (2) 2013 pp. 195-202

Joanna Suliburska

Department of Hygiene and Human Nutrition, Poznan University of Life Sciences, Poland

A six-week diet high in fat, fructose and salt and its influence on lipid and mineral status, in rats

Abstract

Introduction. Fat, fructose, and salt consumption has increased in industrialized countries, but there are few studies that have investigated the effect of this eating pattern on metabolic and physiological states. The purpose of this study was thus to assess lipid and carbohydrate metabolism and to estimate iron, zinc, copper, calcium, and magnesium status in rats fed a diet high in fat, fructose, and salt, compared to the control diet.
Material and methods. Wistar rats were assigned to groups fed either a standard diet or a diet high in fat, fructose, and salt (M). After 6 weeks, the animals were weighed and killed. Liver, kidney, heart, pancreas, hair, and blood samples were collected. The total cholesterol, triglyceride, fasting glucose, and insulin levels in serum were measured. The iron, zinc, copper, calcium, and magnesium concentrations in tissues and serum were determined.

Results.It was found that the M diet led to a significant increase in cholesterol and triglyceride levels in the serum of rats. Among rats fed the M diet, a markedly higher serum level of iron and a significantly lower serum level of zinc were observed. A significantly lower iron level in the pancreas, zinc level in the kidneys and pancreas, and copper level in the kidneys it was found in rats with the M diet. The modified diet resulted in markedly lower concentrations of magnesium in the hearts. In the hair of rats on the M diet, higher levels of iron and zinc were observed. The relative masses of the kidneys were markedly higher in rats with the M diet, as compared with the C diet.
Conclusions.Diets high in fat, fructose, and salt disturb lipid status and kidney mass. This modified diet impairs mineral balance in the body.
Keywords: fat, fructose, salt, lipids, zinc, copper, iron, magnesium, calcium
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http://www.food.actapol.net/issue2/volume/8_2_2013.pdf

For citation:

MLA Suliburska, Joanna. "A six-week diet high in fat, fructose and salt and its influence on lipid and mineral status, in rats." Acta Sci.Pol. Technol. Aliment. 12.2 (2013): 195-202.
APA Suliburska J. (2013). A six-week diet high in fat, fructose and salt and its influence on lipid and mineral status, in rats. Acta Sci.Pol. Technol. Aliment. 12 (2), 195-202
ISO 690 SULIBURSKA, Joanna. A six-week diet high in fat, fructose and salt and its influence on lipid and mineral status, in rats. Acta Sci.Pol. Technol. Aliment., 2013, 12.2: 195-202.