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Issue 12 (3) 2013 pp. 311-318

Hoda Nadimi1, Abbas Yousefi nejad2, Abolghasem Djazayery2, Mostafa Hosseini3, Saeed Hosseini2,4

1International Branch, Tehran University of Medical Sciences, Tehran, Iran
2
Department of Nutrition and Biochemistry, Tehran University of Medical Sciences, Tehran, Iran
3
Department of Epidemiology, Tehran University of Medical Sciences, Tehran, Iran
4
Endocrinology and Metabolism Research Center, Tehran University of Medical Sciences, Tehran, Iran

Association of vegan diet with RMR, body composition and oxidative stress

Abstract

Background. There is increasing evidence to suggest that a vegetarian diet low in fat and high in complex carbohydrates offers the potential for decreasing the risk of chronic disease. However, there is little information about the effect of vegetarian diets on resting metabolic rate (RMR). The objective of this study was to determine the association of vegan diet with RMR and body composition and oxidative stress.
Material and methodology. This research is a cross-sectional descriptive analytic study in which two groups of vegetarians and non vegetarians were compared. RMR was determined by indirect calorimetry, the amount of body fat mass (FM), the percentage of free fat mass (FFM), the markers of oxidative stress (MAD), poteins (PCO) and total anti-oxidatant capacity were measured in 20 vegetarians and 20 non-vegetarians. The two groups were matched with regard to body mass index, sex and menstrual cycle. Energy and macronutrient intakes were determined using a 3-day food record and body composition was determined by bioelectric impedance.
Results. VEG reported a lower relative intake of protein (40.45 ±19.41 g, 56.96 ±11.94 g, p = 0.04), whereas no differences were observed in daily energy, carbohydrate or fat intakes and body composition. NVEG exhibited a higher absolute RMR (1354.7 ±192.6, 1569.10 ±348.24 Kcal/24 h, p = 0.02). PCO plasma density was seen signifi cantly higher among non-vegetarians (1.09 ±3.6, 0.81 ±0.42, p = 0.02). No signifi cant differences were seen in plasma density of TAC between two groups and MAD was higher amoung vegetarians.
Conclusion. These results suggest that the lower RMR observed in VEG is partially mediated by differences in dietary macronutrient composition.

Keywords: basal metabolic rate, body composition, free fat mass, malondialdehyde, oxidative stress, vegetarian diet
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http://www.food.actapol.net/issue3/volume/8_3_2013.pdf

For citation:

MLA Nadimi, Hoda, et al. "Association of vegan diet with RMR, body composition and oxidative stress." Acta Sci.Pol. Technol. Aliment. 12.3 (2013): 311-318.
APA Nadimi H., Yousefi nejad A., Djazayery A., Hosseini M., Hosseini S., (2013). Association of vegan diet with RMR, body composition and oxidative stress. Acta Sci.Pol. Technol. Aliment. 12 (3), 311-318
ISO 690 NADIMI, Hoda, et al. Association of vegan diet with RMR, body composition and oxidative stress. Acta Sci.Pol. Technol. Aliment., 2013, 12.3: 311-318.