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Łagowska K., Jeszka J., 2010. The effect of nutritional status, selected sex hormones and SHBG on plasma leptin levels in young female athletes with menstrual disorders. Acta Sci.Pol. Technol. Aliment. 9 (4), 469-475

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Issue 9 (4) 2010 pp. 469-475

Karolina Łagowska, Jan Jeszka

Poznań University of Life Sciences

The effect of nutritional status, selected sex hormones and SHBG on plasma leptin levels in young female athletes with menstrual disorders

Abstract

 

Background. This study was focused on investigations of secondary regulators of plasma leptin levels such as prolactin, testosterone, sex hormone binding globulin (SHBG) and nutritional status, in young female athletes with menstrual disorders.
Material and methods. Thirty four female professional rowers with menstrual disorders (amenorrhoea and oligomenorrhoea), aged 18.1 ±2.0, with a training period of 4.3 ±2.1 and BMI of 21.0 ±2.1 kg/m2,withtoo high (IL) or too low plasma leptin levels (DL) participated in the study. The nutritional status was evaluated based on the analysis of body composition using the BIA method – percentage of adipose tissue (FM) and fat free mass (FFM) and skinfold thickness (ST) using a Harpenden skinfold caliper. Moreover, serum levels of leptin, prolactin, testosterone and SHBG were estimated using RIA kits.
Results. Values of BMI, ST, FM were significantly (p < 0.05) higher in IL athletes, while FFM was significantly (p < 0.05) lower compared to DL rowers (BMI: IL 22.3 ±2.2 kg/m2, DL 20.2 ±1.4 kg/m2, ST: IL 12.4 ±4.0 mm, DL 9.5 ±2.1 mm, FM: IL: 23.2 ±4.9%, DL: 19.3 ±3.3%, FFM: IL 76.8 ±4.9%, DL 80.7 ±3.4%). The results of plasma leptin level correlated (p < 0.05) with anthropometric parameters (age: r = –0.38, body mass: r = 0.46, BMI: r = 0.59, ST: r = 0.40), body composition (FM%: r = 0.48, FM kg:
r = 0.55, FFM%: r = –0.48), prolactin (r = 0.72) and testosterone levels (r = 0.43).

Conclusions. The results confirmed the strong influence of body mass and fat mass on serum leptin levels. However, high prolactin and testosterone levels may also favourably increased plasma leptin levels in athletes and also affect m

Background. This study was focused on investigations of secondary regulators of plasma leptin levels such as prolactin, testosterone, sex hormone binding globulin (SHBG) and nutritional status, in young female athletes with menstrual disorders.
Material and methods. Thirty four female professional rowers with menstrual disorders (amenorrhoea and oligomenorrhoea), aged 18.1 ±2.0, with a training period of 4.3 ±2.1 and BMI of 21.0 ±2.1 kg/m2,withtoo high (IL) or too low plasma leptin levels (DL) participated in the study. The nutritional status was evaluated based on the analysis of body composition using the BIA method – percentage of adipose tissue (FM) and fat free mass (FFM) and skinfold thickness (ST) using a Harpenden skinfold caliper. Moreover, serum levels of leptin, prolactin, testosterone and SHBG were estimated using RIA kits.
Results. Values of BMI, ST, FM were significantly (p < 0.05) higher in IL athletes, while FFM was significantly (p < 0.05) lower compared to DL rowers (BMI: IL 22.3 ±2.2 kg/m2, DL 20.2 ±1.4 kg/m2, ST: IL 12.4 ±4.0 mm, DL 9.5 ±2.1 mm, FM: IL: 23.2 ±4.9%, DL: 19.3 ±3.3%, FFM: IL 76.8 ±4.9%, DL 80.7 ±3.4%). The results of plasma leptin level correlated (p < 0.05) with anthropometric parameters (age: r = –0.38, body mass: r = 0.46, BMI: r = 0.59, ST: r = 0.40), body composition (FM%: r = 0.48, FM kg:
r = 0.55, FFM%: r = –0.48), prolactin (r = 0.72) and testosterone levels (r = 0.43).

Conclusions. The results confirmed the strong influence of body mass and fat mass on serum leptin levels. However, high prolactin and testosterone levels may also favourably increased plasma leptin levels in athletes and also affect menstrual disorders.enstrual disorders.

 

Keywords: leptin, testosterone, prolactin, SHBG, amenorrhoea, oligomenorrhoea
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For citation:

MLA Łagowska, Karolina, and Jan Jeszka. "The effect of nutritional status, selected sex hormones and SHBG on plasma leptin levels in young female athletes with menstrual disorders." Acta Sci.Pol. Technol. Aliment. 9.4 (2010): 469-475.
APA Łagowska K., Jeszka J. (2010). The effect of nutritional status, selected sex hormones and SHBG on plasma leptin levels in young female athletes with menstrual disorders. Acta Sci.Pol. Technol. Aliment. 9 (4), 469-475
ISO 690 ŁAGOWSKA, Karolina, JESZKA, Jan. The effect of nutritional status, selected sex hormones and SHBG on plasma leptin levels in young female athletes with menstrual disorders. Acta Sci.Pol. Technol. Aliment., 2010, 9.4: 469-475.